Mid-Week Games and Shared Players

by JohnBowen

Giants @ Cubs (Shawon Dunston)

Red Sox @ Phillies (Curt Schilling)

Brewers @ Yankees (CC Sabathia)

Mets @ Tigers (Howard Johnson)

Cardinals @ Orioles (Delino Deshields)

Pirates @ Blue Jays (Lyle Overbay)

Reds @ Rays (Felipe Lopez)

Rangers @ Astros (Ken Caminiti)

Dodgers @ Twins (Otis Nixon)

White Sox @ Rockies (Juan Pierre)

Indians @ Diamondbacks (Carlos Baerga)

Marlins @ Athletics (Mark Kotsay)

Royals @ Padres (Bip Roberts)

Nationals @ Angels (Adam Kennedy)

Braves @ Mariners (Bret Boone)

146 Responses to “Mid-Week Games and Shared Players”

  1. Raul Says:

    What a weak list.

    Ha! Howard Johnson.
    When I was a kid I used to see the hotels and think “wow, this guy must be super rich”

  2. Cameron Says:

    Giants @ Cubs (Goose Gossage)

    Red Sox @ Phillies (Curt Schilling)

    Brewers @ Yankees (CC Sabathia)

    Mets @ Tigers (Ray Knight)

    Cardinals @ Orioles (Hoyt Wilhelm)

    Pirates @ Blue Jays (Dave Parker)

    Reds @ Rays (Johnny Gomes)

    Rangers @ Astros (Nolan Ryan)

    Dodgers @ Twins (Zolio Versailles)

    White Sox @ Rockies (Miguel Olivo)

    Indians @ Diamondbacks (Roberto Alomar)

    Marlins @ Athletics (Josh Willingham)

    Royals @ Padres (Gaylord Perry)

    Nationals @ Angels (Adam Kennedy)

    Braves @ Mariners (George Sherrill)

  3. Raul Says:

    Why isn’t Vladimir Guerrero the player for Nationals/Angels?

    Lame.

  4. Chuck Says:

    Giants/Cubs…Gary Mathews

    Indians/Dbacks…Matt Williams

    Nationals/Angels…has to be Vladdy.

    Ken Caminiti…LOL.

  5. Cameron Says:

    I was just sticking with the Washington Nats in my list, that made Vladdy ineligible.

  6. Raul Says:

    Meaning that with all these lists, we’re just going to completely ignore a franchise that was around for 35 years.

    Bull.

  7. Raul Says:

    A while back we did a hypothetical series between the 1977 Royals and the 1995 Indians.

    I wonder who would win between the 1979 Baltimore Orioles and the 1995 Atlanta Braves.

    The 79 Orioles won 102 games but lost the World Series to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 7 games.

    The 95 Braves won just 90 games, but in a strike-shortened season. Greg Maddux led the way in posting an incredible ERA of 1.63 as Atlanta took care of the Cleveland Indians in 6 games.

    Anyone care to run a simulation?

  8. Cameron Says:

    The MLB’s doing a good job of sweeping it under the rug. The Nats don’t have any retired numbers.

    Yet the Montreal Candiens have plaques of retired numbers for guys who never played for them. How fucked up is that?

  9. Chuck Says:

    “Anyone care to run a simulation?”

    Maybe.

    I’m always intrigued by cross-era matchups but that one wouldn’t otherwise interest me.

    The ‘69 Orioles would wipe the floor with the ‘79 team.

  10. JohnBowen Says:

    These lists are just the first guy that comes to mind (last week when the Mariners played the Marlins, I couldn’t come up with anyone so I actually had to look it up).

    They aren’t the very best player shared by each franchise.

    As for the Expos?

    Eh.

    If the good people of Monteal had cared as much about that team as Raul seems to, we wouldn’t have the Washington Nationals to begin with.

  11. Chuck Says:

    “The Nats don’t have any retired numbers”

    How long have they been playing, five years?

    The Expos have four..Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Rusty Staub and Tim Raines.

  12. Chuck Says:

    Minor League baseball suspended Donovan Tate 50 games for non-PED drug use.

    Dumbass.

  13. Cameron Says:

    Then the retirement of #42, and I think they also retired Jackie Robinson’s number when he played as part of the Montreal minor league affiliate for the Dodgers.

  14. Cameron Says:

    Ouch. That sucks, I like Donovan Tate. Rough talent, but loads of potential.

    Hopefully he gets straightened out like Jeffress did. He’s in Omaha right now getting stretched to start.

  15. Cameron Says:

    “Tampa Bay could Add Paryoll During Summer”.

    …Say what?

  16. Raul Says:

    Funny, John.

    As much as you orgasm over Tim Raines, I figured you’d be all over naming former Expos players.

    You guys might be a bit young to remember that 94 Montreal team. Then again, I was just 14 at the time, but:

    C – Darren Fletcher
    1B – Cliff Floyd
    2B – Mike Lansing
    3B – Sean Berry
    SS – Wil Cordero
    LF – Moises Alou
    CF – Marquis Grissom
    RF – Larry Walker

    SP – Ken Hill
    SP – Pedro Martinez
    SP – Jeff Fassero
    SP – Butch Henry
    SP – Kirk Rueter

    RP – John Wetteland
    RP – Mel Rojas
    RP – Gil Heredia
    RP – Jeff Shaw
    RP – Tim Scott

    That team was 74-40 (.649) and while the names might not seem so impressive, a bunch of those guys were having a great season.

    http://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/MON/1994.shtml

    Note that Larry Walker had 44 doubles that year — in 103 games.

  17. Cameron Says:

    Jesus christ, Wilfredo Cordero. That guy goes toe-to-toe with Kevin Mitchell in the batshit insane department.

  18. JohnBowen Says:

    If Raines’s HOF exclusion has shown anything, it’s that games played in Montreal don’t count.

  19. Cameron Says:

    Gary Carter and Andre Dawson are in there with Expos caps…

    But since they got famous in New York and Chicago, respectively, I tend to agree.

  20. John Says:

    They both wanted different caps.

    Hardly a surprise.

  21. Cameron Says:

    I think that’s because they actually liked playing in somewhere other than Canada.

  22. Raul Says:

    For some reason, I confused Wil Cordero with Marty Cordova.

    Cordero was a nut. Cordova was a decent player for Minnesota.
    In looking up Cordova, I found something funny and something sad.

    Marty Cordova fell asleep in a tanning bed, causing him to miss several Orioles day games.

    But sadly (pasted from wikipedia):

    On the morning of Dec. 16, 2010 Ashley McAdam, Cordova’s daughter, was heading to Herriman High School just outside Salt Lake City. She was a passenger in a vehicle driven by a friend that was hit by a truck as it pulled into school. She suffered severe head trauma and is currently in a coma. In addition to the head trauma, she broke her jaw, elbow and thighbone. Cordova and Ashley’s mother, Tamara McAdam-Burleigh, have set up a Facebook page titled “Supporting Ashley McAdam,” where people can offer support.

  23. Raul Says:

    Based on her facebook page, it does look like she’s in recovery though.

  24. Chuck Says:

    It’s widely known in Puerto Rican baseball circles that Wil Cordero was a steriod drug kingpin and made more money supplying pro baseball players with steriods than he ever did as a player.

    I miss Shaun.

    Yes, he’s a retard, but every once in awhile you find something that makes him look like the founder of Mensa.

    http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2011/06/01/by-the-numbers-leave-behind-the-left-on-base-lob-statistic/#comments

  25. Chuck Says:

    “If Raines’s HOF exclusion has shown anything, it’s that games played in Montreal don’t count.”

    Yeah, I was going to say the same thing.

    If he spent his whole career in Seattle, he would have been first ballot.

  26. Chuck Says:

    Did you see the poll on Bleacher Report yesterday?

    Out of 868 respondents, more people believe Omar Vizquel to be a better HOF candidate than Raines.

  27. Raul Says:

    Omar won’t get in.
    But he’s 68 and could start at SS (at least defensively) right now.

  28. Cameron Says:

    Omar is one of the best defensive shortstops of all time, but even if he could hit five HR a year, he’d be great for the Hall. But the man was not a good hitter.

    Ozzie Smith was good enough with the stick to get in, Omar never was and will never be even if he consumes Prince Fielder’s body weight in steroids.

  29. Chuck Says:

    Both Carlos Beltran and Jason Bay have grand slams in the game against detroit..both off Daniel Schlereth.

    Mets up 13-0 in the fifth.

  30. Cameron Says:

    Fernando Tatis chuckles at their pale attempts to copy his greatness.

  31. Raul Says:

    David Price is going to get the loss for my fantasy team this week after being completely dominant because the Rays can’t score for shit.

    Why don’t you guys just burn down my house and kick me in the nuts, too.

  32. Cameron Says:

    Fun Baseball Names: Chi-Chi Olivo.

  33. Raul Says:

    Rico Brogna trumps any baseball name, ever.

  34. JohnBowen Says:

    “Did you see the poll on Bleacher Report yesterday?
    Out of 868 respondents, more people believe Omar Vizquel to be a better HOF candidate than Raines.”

    50% of respondents thought that Derek Jeter was a better SS than Honus Wagner.

  35. Cameron Says:

    “50% of respondents thought that Derek Jeter was a better SS than Honus Wagner.”

    More than, and not just Honus Wagner. All shortstops ever. Fuck me sideways.

  36. JohnBowen Says:

    Jeter doesn’t play shortstop…it’s more like he leads shortstop.

  37. JohnBowen Says:

    Watching the Dbacks and Indians.

    Carlos Santana just absolutely crushed a ball, just inside the foul pole. 2-R homer ties the game at 4.

    Sorry Daniel Hudson. No win for you.

  38. JohnBowen Says:

    JJ Putz was having a solid come-back year, but lately it seems like blowing saves is all he knows how to do.

    Chisenhall coming up with the go-ahead run at second base. He had a beautiful RBI double earlier in the game.

  39. Cameron Says:

    Jeter True Yankees shortstop.

  40. JohnBowen Says:

    He’s clutch and calm-eyed. And oh-so dreamy. Remember the flip play? It still gives me a woody.

  41. JohnBowen Says:

    Cleveland’s pitcher, Tony Sipp, let Ryan Roberts get two ridiculous jumps to steal 2nd and 3rd.

    Winning run on third, 1 out.

    Bloomquist is up. Willie Mo Pena is on deck.

  42. JohnBowen Says:

    Willie Mo Pena just hit a walk-off home run to end the game.

  43. JohnBowen Says:

    They’re interviewing Pena.

    Nothing he’s saying strikes me as actual words.

  44. JohnBowen Says:

    The Dbacks bench was calling for a balk right before that.

    There was nothing there.

    Pitcher stepped off exactly the right way.

  45. Cameron Says:

    The flip play… 2001 WS?

  46. Lefty33 Says:

    Fun Baseball Names: Gookie Dawkins

    http://web.minorleaguebaseball.com/milb/stats/stats.jsp?pos=2B&sid=t494&t=p_pbp&pid=235194

  47. JohnBowen Says:

    @45, it was in the ALDS against the A’s, with Jeremy Giambi running.

    That’s because Jeremy Giambi wasn’t a baseball player so much as a computer programmed by Billy Beane to walk a lot and therefore had no concept on the idea of SLIDING.

  48. Chuck Says:

    “That’s because Jeremy Giambi wasn’t a baseball player so much as a computer programmed by Billy Beane to walk a lot and therefore had no concept on the idea of SLIDING.”

    Pretty accurate description.

  49. Bob Says:

    Have not seen this posted anywhere, and apologize if someone already mentioned it, but South Carolina won the college World Series for the second year in a row.

  50. Chuck Says:

    Happy 75th birthday Harmon Killebrew

    RIP

  51. Chuck Says:

    Nice anti-stat article.

    http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/6708682/the-math-problem

  52. Chuck Says:

    And a follow-up ripping by BP

    http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=14385#commentMessage

  53. JohnBowen Says:

    Doesn’t apply nearly as much to baseball as it does basketball.

    Meshing together as a team is so much more important in basketball than in baseball.

    Not that it’s not important in baseball. Catchers who work well with pitchers, for example, are immensely important. Carlos Ruiz, Mike Matheney, Brad Ausmus and company are all vastly underrated for their (pretty much statistically indeterminate) ability to handle a pitching staff. There are other things, like outfielders calling balls, double play partners being in sync, the pitcher and 1st baseman communicating on a 3-1 play at first etc.

    But in basketball, the team can be so much more (or less) than the sum of it’s parts. That Pistons championship team in 2004 was a good example of that.

    In baseball, you essentially have the sum of your parts. I mean, more/less. Intangibles count. But if Barry Bonds and Jeff Kent can’t get along, that doesn’t stop them from combining for 80 HR year after year, or reaching base at a ridiculous clip. Their biggest effect on Rich Aurilia isn’t hitting him in the post with a well-placed bounce pass, but just being there in the on-deck circle, ensuring that Aurilia got a steady dose of fastballs.

  54. JohnBowen Says:

    “Well, guys, I appreciate your concern, I really do. But do me a favor, would you? Just shut up. I know which end of the bottle the beer comes out of, I really do. I’ve watched ballgames outside, in actual sunlight—no, really. If knowing that a pitcher’s BABIP against rate in a small sample is largely unpredictive of his rate in a larger sample makes it harder for you to enjoy watching a game, I’m sorry. But if knowing more about baseball makes it harder for you to enjoy the game, then I’m really not seeing your case that you’re the better fan than someone like me”

    Amen brother.

  55. Chuck Says:

    “But if knowing more about baseball makes it harder for you to enjoy the game..”

    Therein lies the problem.

    The more you know the game, the more the stats, whatever your choice, make sense, and the more they can be used to prove or disprove a point.

    The BP guy made a great point about the kid who goes to the game and only watches the numbers change.

    If all you know is numbers, then it makes total sense when people say stupid things like Derek Jeter sucks or Tim Raines is a HOFer.

    “It’s not sabermetrics, it’s sabermatricians”

  56. JohnBowen Says:

    Every time I go to a game and see a runner on second with no outs, I get excited because I know he’s probably going to score. If he doubled, great. If he reached on a 2-base error, just as well. If he walked and stole second, terrific.

    Seeing a player on second with no outs and NOT getting excited is a sure sign of someone who doesn’t know what the hell is going on in a baseball game.

    Knowing that a player was on second with no outs while rarely failing to make an out to get there?

    Pretty much the same deal.

  57. Chuck Says:

    No fucking shit, John.

  58. JohnBowen Says:

    You’d think it was no fucking shit.

    But there’s this one player who was on second with no outs pretty much all the time. He’s probably the second best leadoff hitter of all-time for that very reason.

    But for superficial reasons like you “not feeling it”…well, we’ve done this time and time again.

  59. Chuck Says:

    “well, we’ve done this time and time again”

    And, yet, here we are, doing it again.

  60. Chuck Says:

    To make Raul’s day.

    Phil Hughes is making a rehab start today in AA Trenton.

    Through four innings, he has allowed one hit and has five strikeouts.

    On 21 pitches.

  61. Chuck Says:

    Gameday sucks.

    Minor games only record strikes.

    It was 39 through four, with 32 strikes.

    Total is still really low, and the B/S ratio is off the charts.

  62. Raul Says:

    Nice! @ Hughes.

    John,

    I look at stats. Even some that are considered “saber”.
    But my problem (and I’ve always stated it) is that stat heads act like their way is the only way and they come up with the classic excuses when they’re wrong.

    A team has X-stats, therefore they should do Y.
    And when it doesn’t, the response is “well, the sh*t is a crapshoot…”

    There’s just a fundamental difference in how people see things.

    Stat guy: The GM shouldn’t have signed this guy. He’s got an EqA of .255.
    Baseball guy: The GM shouldn’t have signed this guy. He’s got a hole in his swing and has trouble recognizing the slider.

    Same thing. Except the difference is the baseball guy offers you a reason why the player sucks, and even provides a possible solution to the problem.

    When people were bashing David Wright, Shaun kept preaching about how his numbers are awesome and he is fine and that he should keep doing what he’s doing.

    What others were saying is that while Wright was going just great, people need to pay attention to his mechanics and how he reacts to inside pitches because he’s quite liable to really take a dive.

    Here we are, David Wright is on the DL, having hit .226. Yeah, back injury, but it’s more than that if you actually watch the games.

    And it’s not like I’m resting the case on David Wright. I’m just trying to make a point.

    The disingenuous thing is that people like Shaun come in here and say “well you need scouts and stats” and never have any comments or insight into the scouting part because they have no idea what the hell they are talking about. All they can do is reference numbers because those are easy to grasp. It takes a certain kind of experience to look at something and understand why it is right, or why it is wrong.

    It’s like watching boxing. You can sit there and talk about the CompuBox numbers — how one guy is up 4 rounds to 2 and is landing more punches. But if you can’t see that the “losing” fighter has been nailing the “winning” fighter with heavy body shots, you are going to be shocked when that “winning” fighter tastes the canvas in the 10th.

  63. Cameron Says:

    Let’s try another Hall of Fame argument. Reading my Bill James Historical Abstract (always a fun read) and there’s an argument that with a little more luck, Jim Kaat could be a first ballot Hall of Famer.

    He never really had a big season, but his stretch between ‘62-’70 was good.

    ‘62 – 18-14
    ‘63 – 10-10
    ‘64 – 17-11
    ‘65 – 18-11
    ‘66 – 25-13
    ‘67 – 16-13
    ‘68 – 14-12
    ‘69 – 14-13
    ‘70 – 14-10

    Now, rearrange those wins a little bit to give him more than 1 20 win season.

    ‘62 – 20-12
    ‘63 – 10-10
    ‘64 – 16-12
    ‘65 – 20-9
    ‘66 – 24-14
    ‘67 – 15-14
    ‘68 – 14-12
    ‘69 – 14-13
    ‘70 – 13-11

    Better series of breaks and more big seasons. Do you think if this happens, Kaat would have been a Hall of Famer?

  64. Cameron Says:

    “It’s like watching boxing. You can sit there and talk about the CompuBox numbers — how one guy is up 4 rounds to 2 and is landing more punches. But if you can’t see that the “losing” fighter has been nailing the “winning” fighter with heavy body shots, you are going to be shocked when that “winning” fighter tastes the canvas in the 10th.”

    Or for the more modern audience, Mixed Martial Arts. I remember watching Chael Sonnen vs. Anderson Silva. Sonnen broke the UFC record for number of strikes landed on his opponent by the fourth round in a five round fight.

    Yet he took Silva to the ground in that fifth round to keep the offense going, despite the fact Sonnen isn’t a good submission guy and can be quick to tap. When Silva was on the ground, he caught Sonnen by surprise with a triangle choke and won after getting completely brutalized.

    Sonnen (who was also on steroids for the fight), did everything he could to knock Silva out, but Silva realized there’s more to a fight than just punching guys in the face. Silva was the better fighter because he actually has gameplans coming into the fight.

  65. Chuck Says:

    “Silva was the better fighter because he actually has gameplans coming into the fight.”

    A fact Muhammed Ali was well aware of in Zaire.

  66. JohnBowen Says:

    “Here we are, David Wright is on the DL, having hit .226. Yeah, back injury, but it’s more than that if you actually watch the games.”

    As I recall, Joe D wrote that article like 10 games into the season. Wright ended up starting the all-star game and hitting 29 home runs.

    One year later, and he’s had a crappy 30 games or whatever it is. Maybe he’s bailing, I’m not sure. Haven’t seen him play yet (nor have most Mets fans. What with the injuries and all).

    “A team has X-stats, therefore they should do Y.
    And when it doesn’t, the response is “well, the sh*t is a crapshoot…””

    That’s not the statguy’s response. At least it shouldn’t be.

    The response is that a team with X-stats is LIKELY to do Y.

    Baseball is wonderfully unpredictable. Anything can happen. Being good isn’t a sure thing. But you can do things to increase your chances.

    Before the season started, I boldly proclaimed that the A’s would win 90 games because their offense, while not very good, would be good enough to alongside the pitching staff to propel the A’s to the top of the West.

    It’s not working out that way (though they aren’t very far out of the race either).

    If you built an offense with guys who had the same statistics as Willingham, Dejesus, etc in conjunction with the A’s pitching staff (assuming good health), I maintain that it would win between 87-93 games ~75% of the time.

    That offense is atrocious this season. Worse than expected. I don’t need to make abstract excuses. They were supposed to be better. Using the information I had, I made a guess, and so far, I’m wrong.

    Theo Epstein, a GM who I think is VERY good, traded Bronson Arroyo for Willie Mo Pena. That was a terrible move. Completely indefensible. But no one is going to be 100% successful. If you’re hoping for that – as a player, coach, manager, exec, or fan…you’re going to be disappointed. If your way (and your way really needs to include both baseball people and stats guys) works an optimal amount of the time, than you can’t really ask for more than that.

    Like, if you’re playing blackjack. Maybe you hit on 11 and get a 2, while someone else hits on 17 and gets a 4, while the dealer shows 4 and gets to 17. That one time, you got hosed. Long run? You wanna keep hitting on 11, standing on 17 and you’ll come out better than the guy who hits on 17.

  67. Chuck Says:

    “Better series of breaks and more big seasons. Do you think if this happens, Kaat would have been a Hall of Famer?”

    No.

  68. JohnBowen Says:

    At least he shouldn’t have been.

  69. Chuck Says:

    “Using the information I had, I made a guess.”

    Exactly.

    What I really want to know is how much of Bill James’ “consulting” had to do with John Lackey’s contract.

  70. JohnBowen Says:

    “What I really want to know is how much of Bill James’ “consulting” had to do with John Lackey’s contract.”

    Who knows?

    It’s not a good-looking contract at all.

    The Red Sox made a guess based on the information at hand that he would be worth an 80 million dollar contract.

    They were wrong.

    Should they stop trying to acquire pitchers with Lackey-ish resume’s?

    Maybe. The fact that he missed around 13 starts in the two years preceding his acquisition should’ve been a warning flare.

    But in general, you make guesses based on the information provided. The more scientific your guesses, the more OFTEN you’ll be right. Doesn’t mean you won’t get a dud every so often.

  71. brautigan Says:

    When I play stratomatic, I’m a stat head.
    When I watch a baseball game in person, I’m a baseball fan.
    When I watch a game on tv, I’m asleep.

    It really is that simple.

  72. brautigan Says:

    JB: What would you call Chone Figgins contract? Besides a mistake?

    LOL

  73. Chuck Says:

    You’re right, John.

    A fourth grader could have looked at Lackey’s two previous seasons, his career record against the AL East, and his career record at Fenway and told him to kiss off.

    And yet the saber driven Red Sox front office gave him $80 million dollars.

  74. JohnBowen Says:

    @Brautigan

    Figgins’ contract wasn’t exactly a bank-breaking thing. 4y/36M

    Now, I know he had a WAR-rific year in 2009 and that’s why he’s such a common example.

    But basically it was a pretty good player’s deal and he was a pretty good player.

    I’m not sure if there were any warning signs that would indicate that he would suck so hard. I didn’t really get why they had him switch to second base, especially knowing Ackley was coming up.

    It was certainly a more worthwhile deal than, say, the deals the Angels and Dodgers made for Gary Matthews Jr. and Juan Pierre.

  75. JohnBowen Says:

    A fourth grader also could’ve looked at Juan Pierre’s entire body of work and thought…yeah, he’s fast. So what? Don’t give him a 50 million dollars…and yet the non-saber LA Dodgers gave Pierre that very deal.

    The difference is, the Red Sox are right far more often than the Dodgers.

  76. brautigan Says:

    JB: Funny thing is, Juan Pierre is really a great stratomatic player. Speed kills in that game. How he earns gazillions playing baseball is beyond me.

  77. JohnBowen Says:

    Against the Yankees, Lackey is career 5-6 with a 4.68 ERA, 1.496 WHIP, and 2.1 K/BB ratio.

    Not the best numbers, sure.

    But how do Yankee opponents usually do?

    The Yankee bats consistently have scored 5.3-6 R/G over the course of Lackey’s career.

  78. JohnBowen Says:

    Out of curiosity, Brautigan, why can’t you get into baseball on TV?

    I mean, nothing can really beat the real thing, but on the other hand, you’ve got a pretty good seat!

  79. Raul Says:

    I called that Lackey contract a waste from the second it was announced.
    And I’m saying the exact same thing right now about Carl Crawford.

  80. Chuck Says:

    “Figgins’ contract wasn’t exactly a bank-breaking thing. 4y/36M”

    Nine million a year for four.

    Pierre’s was 5/44.

    Less than nine million a year.

    I guess that WAS a bank-breaking deal?

    Pierre’s deal looks bad four years after he signed it, because he hasn’t come close to producing what he did in the six years BEFORE he signed.

    Lackey’s deal was a bad deal before Theo handed him the pen.

    There’s a difference, John.

    One I’m sure you’re fully aware of.

  81. JohnBowen Says:

    Pierre sucked for all but two years in Florida.

    Lackey was good for the last 5 years before signing in Boston.

  82. Cameron Says:

    Lackey was good, but even Lackey at his best wasn’t worth that much money.

  83. Raul Says:

    John Lackey pitched in a pathetic division and was one of the most hittable pitchers around.

    He was going into a division with better hitters, into a hitters ballpark.

    It didn’t take any complex stats analysis to realize Lackey was going to get crushed.

  84. JohnBowen Says:

    One of the biggest myths is that the unbalanced schedule drastically warps a pitcher’s opponent quality.

    You know who had the easiest opponents last year (according to total-opponent OPS)?

    CC Sabathia

  85. Chuck Says:

    “Pierre sucked for all but two years in Florida.”

    WAR tell you that?

    Or OPS+?

    He led the NL in games played five straight seasons.

    He led in PA’s two years, and in the top five the other three.

    He led in AB’s three years and in the top five the other two.

    He led the NL in hits and in the top five the other three.

    He was in the top ten in times on base twice.

    Just because he didn’t walk 80 times doesn’t mean he wasn’t an effective lead-off hitter.

    The Dodgers got to the NLCS the first two years after the contract, too, by the way.

    It bugs me I have to defend a player I don’t particularly like, but it bugs me more that Figgin’s contract “didn’t break the bank” and Pierre’s was the worst in history and they’re the exact goddamn same thing.

  86. Raul Says:

    “One of the biggest myths is that the unbalanced schedule drastically warps a pitcher’s opponent quality.”

    So what you’re saying is that the Yankees could play the Phillies in interleague play and the Red Sox could play the Nationals, and it wouldn’t make any difference on the pitchers of the Yankees and Red Sox.

    FAN-tastic.

    Dynamite, John.
    Pure dynamite.

  87. JohnBowen Says:

    @86, no. Holy shit. Learn to read.

    I’m saying the difference between the average OPS an Orioles pitcher has to face and the average OPS an Angels pitcher have to face are MAYBE 40 points off.

    “He led the NL in games played five straight seasons.”

    Irrelevant.

    “He led in AB’s three years and in the top five the other two.”

    Happens when you hit first and your managers refuse to bench you, even for sucking.

    “The Dodgers got to the NLCS the first two years after the contract, too, by the way.”

    …after Pierre was made into a 4th OFer.

    “Just because he didn’t walk 80 times doesn’t mean he wasn’t an effective lead-off hitter.”

    yes, it does. But you think walks hurt the team.

    “He was in the top ten in times on base twice.”

    You JUST SAID that he was top-2 in at-bats like every year. He got more chances to reach base! He was LESS effective at reaching base than the AVERAGE baseball player. As evidenced by OBP.

  88. Raul Says:

    lol

    If you really think a pitcher making 7 starts against the Mariners and Athletics is not a significant difference between 7 starts against the Yankees and Rays, you’re dumber than I thought.

  89. John Says:

    Lets say the Yankees/Rays average 1.5 more r/g.

    So in those 7 games, you’re giving up about 7 more runs if u go 6 innings.

    That’s your grand difference. About one extra run per month.

  90. Chuck Says:

    You’re not winning, statboy.

    “He was LESS effective at reaching base than the AVERAGE baseball player. As evidenced by OBP.”

    Wrong.

    Juan Pierre average OBP 2003-2007=.344

    NL average OBP 2003-2007= .333

  91. Raul Says:

    Sometimes, you’re just hopeless.

    Anyway,

    I need Justin Smoak to get hot so I can move him for another reliever because taking on Jojo Reyes was pointless. I thought I could take some points given that he has SP eligibility but he’s killing me.

    Brian Duensing is available as a RP with SP eligibility, but he’s not much better.

  92. Cameron Says:

    Juan Pierre was alright. He got a lot of hits, stole a lot of bases, and played good defense.

    Was he worth 9 million dollars? Not to me.

  93. Chuck Says:

    “Was he worth 9 million dollars? Not to me.”

    Not to me, either, but not the point.

  94. Chuck Says:

    “Juan Pierre was alright. He got a lot of hits, stole a lot of bases, and played good defense”

    Tim Raines without the defense?

  95. Cameron Says:

    Or the bat or plate discipline. I’d call Juan Pierre a poor man’s Time Raines, but he’s more like a homeless man’s Time Raines.

  96. Cameron Says:

    Tim Raines and Tim Raines, dunno how I fucked that name up.

  97. Chuck Says:

    It’s been said that traditionalists undervalue walks, and sabermetricians overvalue them.

    Our on-going Tim Raines debate proves that statement beyond a reasonable doubt.

  98. John Says:

    So, in Raul’s head, the A’s always score one run and the Yankees alwaus score 10.

    Not how the game works.

    Juan Pierre had one positive: speed.

    Tim Raines is the second-best leadoff hitter of all time. Like, ever.

    Juan Pierre, at his best, was the second best leadoff man on his own team.

  99. Chuck Says:

    “Tim Raines is the second-best leadoff hitter of all time. Like, ever.”

    You know what that is?

    Subjective.

    “Juan Pierre, at his best, was the second best leadoff man on his own team.”

    So is that.

    One is definitely wrong, the other is probably right.

    You decide which is which, and if someone disagrees, that’s life.

  100. brautigan Says:

    JB @ 78. Baseball on tv is such a wonderful thing, however, by the 4th inning, I find myself asleep. Perhaps it is the zen of the thing….I really don’t know. Most of the time I watch on tv, I’m too busy watching the catcher set up and guessing what the next pitch will be. I’m surprised I am correct as much as I am. So, if I need to get some sleep, I’ll put a game on. Works like a charm.

  101. Chuck Says:

    Terry Francona has officially lost his mind.

    http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20110628&content_id=21113330&vkey=news_mlb&c_id=mlb

  102. Chuck Says:

    “I’m too busy watching the catcher set up and guessing what the next pitch will be. I’m surprised I am correct as much as I am”

    We used to sit around and do that for money.

    We’d ante up between pitches like they were poker hands.

    Had to get the pitch AND the location.

  103. brautigan Says:

    Chuck: how funny you’d say that. We used to do the same thing in Reno. By the 7th inning we were so inebriated we would be prediciting the “blooper pitch” would be the next pitch.

    By the way, I don’t know if you saw my other post, but I’ll be in Visalia Saturday night and I hope to see Phil Plantier. You still want a Plantier autograph for your dad? Hopefully he’ll personalize it, unlike Rooster Rick.

  104. Chuck Says:

    Sure.

  105. brautigan Says:

    Dick, right?

  106. Raul Says:

    That’s what she said.

  107. Chuck Says:

    Haha…that didn’t go as planned.

  108. brautigan Says:

    Raul, I have to hook up with you one of these days in California. I know we’re going to have a killer of a time. (Or, if you’re ever in Oregon……..)

  109. Raul Says:

    My brother works for an airline and travels a lot. The next time he heads up to Portland or Seattle I’ll try to make the trip.

    I hear it’s real nice up there.

  110. Cameron Says:

    ….Terry, I know you want to get more production out of right field. I understand that. Adrian Gonzalez has only started two games in RF in his life, though. That’s a terrible decision.

    Also, WHY THE FUCK ARE YOU PLAYING DAVID ORTIZ IN THE MUTHAFUCKIN’ FIELD!!!!

  111. Cameron Says:

    Also, Ryan Franklin has just been handed his pink slip

  112. Chuck Says:

    Way to go, Nomar, be rippin’ on UZR.

  113. Cameron Says:

    Huh, my memory’s a little shaky. Was Nomar good with the glove or not. I want to judge the irony level here.

  114. Chuck Says:

    He was alright, nothing to write home about.

    He was pretty good his first couple of years, then he bulked up and lost his range.

  115. Cameron Says:

    Bulked up, lost range, but he hit better.

    …Steroids? Late 90s Boston wasn’t exactly a den of clean living.

  116. Chuck Says:

    Winner, winner….

  117. Raul Says:

    Manny. Juiced.
    Ortiz. Juiced.

    Every single person called to Congress was confirmed juicer. Yet people are supposed to believe that Schilling was the only clean one. Yeah. Sure.
    Nomar was clearly juicing.
    I’m pretty damn sure Trot Nixon was a juicer also. But I’d bet more that Jason Varitek was.

    Did any of them appear in the Mitchell Report?

  118. Chuck Says:

    I heard Nixon juiced.

    Nothing on the other two, although I wouldn’t be surprised, especially Schilling.

    If he thought he could get an advantage with anything, he’d probably color a sanitary sock red and say it was blood.

    Oh, wait…

  119. Cameron Says:

    Not even just back then. They had Mo Vaughan earlier that decade. I’d bet five bucks he juiced, but that’s such a sure thing I don’t even want to insult the art of betting.

  120. Raul Says:

    Pretty glad I didn’t start Phil Coke this week.

    He got destroyed by the Mets today. Good lord, the Tigers can’t even beat Chris Capuano.

  121. Chuck Says:

    I don’t even know why you’d have Phil Coke on your roster.

  122. Raul Says:

    Because I had Ryan Franklin and Matt Thornton on my roster and they both sucked so bad that they lost their closer jobs and I needed a reliever to take their spots.

    So I picked up Phil Coke.

    I didn’t want to go and trade for a reliever in April/May because…it’s a closer.

  123. Cameron Says:

    At least Thornton is still on his team. Give him that.

  124. Raul Says:

    Nah Thornton isn’t on my team. Neither is Franklin.

    Giambi went deep today. It’s a little surprising that Giambi doesn’t even have 450 homers. You would think he’d be close to 500 — just based off his reputation as a big guy and a power hitter.

  125. Chuck Says:

    Well, this is fucking interesting.

    Seems like the Yankees have intentionally buried two instances where Jesus Montero was benched for not running out ground balls.

    “Groin strain” my ass.

    http://yankees.lhblogs.com/2010/05/10/nova-called-up-from-scrantonwb/

    http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/37082477/sports/player_news

  126. Chuck Says:

    John, approval on #125 please.

    Raul, until John approves the links, I found two instances where Jesus Montero has been benched for not running out ground balls, and the Yankees buried them.

    The first time was back in May and they used a “groin strain” as the reason why he missed a couple of games, the other time was last weekend and somebody blew the whistle.

  127. Raul Says:

    What?

    TWICE?? In the same season?

  128. Cameron Says:

    Not your team, Raul. I meant the White Sox. Ryan Franklin sucked so hard he got released today.

  129. JohnBowen Says:

    @126, approved.

    Spam comment of the day:

    This site has way higher quality videos: somepornsite

    Shit, that’s what I’ve been forgetting to post!

    Montero’s whole deal (being one of the most overrated prospects ever) aside…how can you not hustle at AAA?

    That’s the one thing that you have total, complete control over. And it’s the one thing that an MLB club can definitively look at and say “screw you, we don’t want you here.” Skills can improve, heart’s one of those things that you either have or you don’t.

  130. Cameron Says:

    And Sergio Mtire’s going back to the bronx.

  131. Raul Says:

    You know what, as much as I hate to agree with silly writers, these guys have a point.

    The Yankees have these guys wasting away in AAA and AA and they go out and get Sergio fucking Mitre?

  132. Raul Says:

    ESPN:

    “Jeter injured himself leaving the batter’s box in the fifth inning of a game on June 13 just six hits shy of the 3,000 plateau. In his absence, the Yankees have won 11 of 14 games, moved from 2½ games back of the Boston Red Sox in the AL East to 2½ games in front, and Jeter’s replacements — Brett Gardner and Nick Swisher in the leadoff spot and Eduardo Nunez at shortstop — have performed more than capably.

    Entering Wednesday, Gardner had batted .286 with a .390 on-base percentage in nine games as the leadoff hitter. In four games atop the lineup, Swisher had hit .307 and had a whopping .526 OBP. At the time of his injury, Jeter was hitting .260 with a .324 OBP.”

    (Major League II)
    Harry Doyle: “Roger Dorn retired over the off-season, eliminating a huge hole at 3rd base.”

  133. Cameron Says:

    Nick Swisher batting leadoff just seems like a bad idea to me. But hey, whatever works.

  134. Raul Says:

    Swisher leading off is only a bad idea depending on who hits behind him.

  135. Lefty33 Says:

    “Maybe. The fact that he missed around 13 starts in the two years preceding his acquisition should’ve been a warning flare.”

    The funny thing about that with Lackey’s contract is that clearly the Red Sox had some idea what they may be getting into because of the way they wrote the club option for ‘15.

    And isn’t it ironic that the Boston media is circling like vultures right now saying that Lackey needs an elbow surgery now.

  136. Cameron Says:

    Swisher just isn’t a leadoff guy. By that I don’t mean he doesn’t walk or steal a lot of bases, but he’s a .250 hitter that hits 25-30 HR a year. That’s not your typical leadoff guy, that’s your five guy, cleanup in a weak lineup.

  137. Bob Says:

    Mike Cameron has been designated for assignment. Is McDonald next???

  138. Chuck Says:

    “Is McDonald next?”

    Then where would Big Papi eat after the games?

  139. Chuck Says:

    Montero homered leading off the second inning today.

    Yes, it was to right field.

  140. Cameron Says:

    Wait, Mike Cameron was able to be designated? I thought guys with his amount of service time could refuse assignment.

  141. Bob Says:

    “Then where would Big Papi eat after the games?” The Sox could hire McDonald as a NESN employee.

  142. Chuck Says:

    There’s a difference between sending a guy to the minors and designating them.

    If a guy has less than five years service time and options remaining, he can be sent down.

    If he has more than five years service time, he can’t be sent down without his permission.

    By designating him, the Red Sox can trade him or release him. They can send him to the minors, but still need Cameron’s permission.

  143. Chuck Says:

    Sorry, Bob, bad joke.

    There’s a McDonald’s across from Fenway Park.

    Never mind.

  144. Raul Says:

    I’m becoming convinced that Jesus Montero is a non-hustling, 230-pound Derek Jeter.

  145. Bob Says:

    My bad. I have eaten at that McDonalds a few times.

  146. Chuck Says:

    That’s where I used to park. Kind of a pain in the ass getting there, but real easy to get out of heading south.

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